Culture Street

This recipe is a slight detour from a traditional potato roesti, but the addition of beetroot works beautifully, and it also fits so well with many of the best roesti accompaniments: smoked salmon,
trout or eel; fried, poached or soft-boiled eggs; smoky bacon; even an indulgent spoon of caviar; and always topped with soft herbs and crème fraîche, or a dollop of sour cream spiked with horseradish. These are just great vehicles for so many things, making for a very satisfying breakfast or brunch.

Serves 4

Ingredients
3 large desiree potatoes, peeled
3 tablespoons grated horseradish (or unsweetened prepared horseradish)
125 g sour cream (or crème fraîche)
1 large beetroot, finely grated
2 tablespoons plain flour
salt flakes and freshly ground black pepper
extra-virgin olive oil
4 eggs
1 handful of tarragon leaves (or ½ bunch of chives, finely chopped)

Method
Add the whole potatoes to a large saucepan and fill with cold salted water. Bring to a simmer and cook for 15–20 minutes. Drain and set aside to cool – the potatoes will still be a little firm.

Combine the horseradish and sour cream in a small bowl. Refrigerate until needed.

Coarsely grate the cooled potatoes over a tray – if you do this in a bowl you can lose the texture by crushing the threads. Add the grated beetroot and flour, season with salt and pepper and combine gently
with open fingers. Shape into cakes the size of tennis balls, being careful not to crush the potato threads too much.

Heat a generous amount of oil in a large frying pan over medium heat. Fry the roestis in batches for about 3 minutes on each side until cooked through and golden – you can keep the cooked roestis warm in a low oven while you fry the remainder.

Fry the eggs to your liking.

Serve two roestis per plate, topped with an egg and a dollop of horseradish cream. Scatter over the tarragon and serve.

Horseradish | I have a particular affection for fresh horseradish – it’s great with a chargrilled steak or some cured fish, for example – but I struggle a little with the prepared versions. I will buy the jarred versions at times, but only ever the unsweetened ones – which are not always that easy to find. You can also freeze fresh horseradish; it’s not quite as good as when it’s fresh, but it’s easily the next best thing.

salads-vegetables-cover-imageRecipes extracted from Salads & Vegetables by Karen Martini. Available now, Plum, RRP $39.99. You can buy the book here.

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