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This is, without a doubt, like choosing between your children. I could list soooooo many, many more. And, yes, I know the ranks of bookshops, the actual physical places, are thinned and thinning further, BUT! I sense a fightback. And I'm there! I'm standing in the lines of those who still want to buy paper books - because of where I go to find them. And I love the surprises, too. I'll go in to find a book for a specific purpose, and come out with a book on Stumpwork and a handbook of Falconry. Because they were there. (I can't embroider to save my life, though I might one day; and we have eagles and hawks up the back on the farm; you can't know too much about Raptors because my chooks and their chicks - hens and chickens - get scared) Is it fair to say that nothing fills me with more joy than a bookshop? A big call. However, I don't want my ashes scattered at sea; owners willing, they could be tipped into the air-conditioning of any of the following (and in no particular order) …

Close to where I live in Tasmania: Fullers Bookshop, Hobart. Such a lovely place to be. Actual writers behind the counter, friendly cooks in the cafe, and a light filled space. They know their stock!

Bookocino, Avalon Beach, Sydney. Adore this place. Long, squeezy, not very wide but packed, packed with books. And, when you've bought one, and had a coffee in the cafe, you can wander to the beach that's pretty much over the road. Now, that's Australian.

Pages & Pages, Mosman, Sydney. I used to live close by. Very damn civilised.

Three Lives, West Village, New York. Just to be there does it for me.

Hatchards, Piccadilly. Set up in 1797, that's nine years after the founding of Australia. Who else has Royal Warrants over their doors? I love being an honorary English woman sometimes. Stepping through that door just brings me home.

Hennessey & Ingalls, Wilshire Boulevard, LA. Architecture - and Art (with a capital A in both cases) - are two major, major passions in my life. Haven't been there for a while but a few years ago I just wanted to bed down in the back and sleep behind a rampart of gorgeous books. There's something about the smooth paper, the very smell of the pages...

Samuel French, Sunset Boulevard. LA is a company town. It's about building Film & TV, instead of cars. This bookstore has all the tools: wonderful books about theatre, film and then some. In a former life, when I went to LA (which I did from time to time) I'd steal time out of my schedule to go there.

Shakespeare and Company, Paris. What a combination. Paris and books. Is Heaven real? Yes it is.

Dymocks, George St Sydney. It's all about that lovely building and the interior balcony cafe where you can look down on the surging shoppers below. Huge stock.

Riverbend Books, Bulimba, Queensland. On the book tour for my first book, The Innocent, I was taken to Riverbend by the local Simon and Schuster Rep. I remember slatted blinds, lovely sub-tropical warmth, charm (that wasn't just languid), and such a welcome. What a lovely experience for a first time author.

Posie Graeme-Evans is the internationally bestselling author of five novels, including The Island House and The Dressmaker. Her latest book, Wild Wood, has just been released. She has worked in Australian film and television for the last thirty years as a director, commissioning executive and creator/producer of hundreds of hours of drama and children’s series, including the worldwide smash hit McLeod’s Daughters and Daytime Emmy nominated Hi-5. She lives in Tasmania with her husband and creative partner, Andrew Blaxland.

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